Mar 162008
 

Last year, the British Journal of Politics and International Relations published an article which essentially argued that higher levels of welfare state spending create attitudes which are conducive to higher turnout. I was not convinced and so I wrote a comment/replication in which I demonstrate that there is no robust evidence for a universal, politically relevant relationship between
inequality/welfare state spending, and turnout
(HTML). The journal has recently accepted the article for publication later in 2008, but for the time being, the manuscript is available here (PDF). I have also set up an archive with replication data for this paper.

Technorati Tags: turnout, voting, political science, inequality, welfare state, institutions, attitudes, inequality

Social Bookmarks:
Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 1Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 2Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 3Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 4Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 5Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 6Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 7Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 8Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 9Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 10Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 11Turnout, Institutions, Inequality, and the Welfare State 12

Also published on Medium.

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.