Candidate localness and voting in England

 
Candidate localness and voting in England

How important is ‘localness’ – the fact that a candidate lives close to their prospective voters – in General Elections in England? Building on our previous research on General Elections and English County Council elections, we look at the 2015 General Election to answer that question. The final article is published in Political Geography. Here is […]

Political Interest Furthers Partisanship in England, Scotland, and Wales

 

1. Introduction In the field of public opinion and voting behaviour, few concepts have stimulated as many analyses and have aroused as much debate as that of party identification. The idea of a durable “identification” with a political party has been a staple in American electoral studies since the 1940s and is at the core […]

Geolocation and voting: candidate-voter distance effects on party choice in the 2010 General Election in England

 
Geolocation and voting: candidate-voter distance effects on party choice in the 2010 General Election in England

The effect of geographical distance between candidate and voter on vote likelihood in the UK is essentially untested. In systems where constituency representatives vie for local inhabitants’ support in elections, candidates living closer to a voter would be expected to have a greater probability of receiving that individual’s support, other things being equal. In this paper, we present a first test of this concept using constituency data (specifically, notice of poll address data) from the British General Election of 2010 and the British Election Survey, together with geographical data from Ordnance Survey and Royal Mail, to test the hypothesis that candidate distance matters in voters’ choice of candidate. Using a conditional logit model, we find that the distance between voter and candidates from the three main parties (Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat) matters in English constituencies, even when controlling for strong predictors of vote-choice, such as party feeling and incumbency advantage.