The Populist/Radical/Extreme Right in Europe

 

Slides

Course Outline/Readings

Introduction and central concepts

Mudde (2007 ch 1)

The Extreme Right before 1980

Blinkhorn (2000, 8–88), Prowe (1994)

The supply side: Authoritarianism, the Economy, and the EU

Lange (2007; Vasilopoulou 2011), background: (Rydgren 2005)

France/Belgium FR: Mayer (2013), BE: Jamin (2012), background: (Hainsworth 2000)
Italy/Austria IT: Bulli and Tronconi (2012), AT: Aichholzer et al. (2014), background: Ruzza and Fella (2009 ch.2), (Luther 2000)
Scandinavia/Germany Scandinavia: Demker (2012), DE: Arzheimer (2015), background: (Sommer 2008)
Netherlands, Great Britain NL: Bos and Brants (2014), GB: Ford and Goodwin (2014), background: Holsteyn and Irwin (2003; Ford and Goodwin 2010)
Greece, Switzerland GR: Ellinas (2013), CH: Skenderovic (2012), background: (Ellinas 2012)
Ideology vs Protest Brug (2003), Brug, Fennema, and Tillie (2000)
The Role of Religion Arzheimer and Carter (2009; Zúquete 2008)
Immigrants Rydgren (2008)

PDFs for all texts should be available through the reader system. Most of the articles are also available electronically on any computer connected to the university network (either on campus or via VPN).

Some relevant peer-reviewed journals

  • Comparative European Politics
  • Comparative Political Studies
  • Comparative Politics
  • Electoral Studies
  • European Journal of Political Research
  • Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
  • West European Politics

Articles from these journals should be available electronically on any computer connected to the university network (either on campus or via VPN).

I also maintain an extensive bibliography on the Radical Right.

Assessment

  1. I expect you to come to class well prepared. If you don’t read the assigned texts, participation is pointless.
  2. Even with a medical certificate, you may miss a maximum of two classes.
  3. Assessment is based on your essay (- words). Your essay title/topic must be chosen from the list below
  4. Plagiarism is the most serious academic offence. It is both morally and legally a form of fraud and will not be tolerated. Students who cheat in this way will be awarded a mark of zero.
  5. Essays must be entirely students’ own work, and any passages from the work of others that are quoted directly, or paraphrased or summarised, must be acknowledged and accompanied by full references. Avoid internet sources as they are not normally peer-reviewed (it is of course absolutely ok to use the electronic version of an article from a peer-reviewed journal). If you absolutely have to use material from the internet, you must give the full URL and the date on which the website was accessed.
  6. Essays must be typed on a computer. They must include an introduction and a bibliography (list of references) that adheres to bibliographic standards. The American Political Science Association’s style manual is a useful but verbose guide (http://www.apsanet.org/files/Publications/APSAStyleManual2006.pdf). The main points are summarised here: http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/DocAPSA.html.
  7. Essays are single-authored
  8. As an alternative, you make work in teams of up to three students on a report for the President of the State Parliament of Rhineland-Palatinate (for administrative reasons, each team member still has to submit an individual copy of the report, and the main author of each section should be flagged up in the text).
  9. The report should assess the problem of right-wing populism in Bourgogne, the Central Bohemian Region, the Opole Voivodeship, and Rhineland-Palatinate, with a special focus on parliamentary representation. It should also entail some recommendations for dealing with this problem politically. The length of the report should be no less than words.

Essay Titles

  • Is the Radical Populist Right after 1980 really completely different from the old, interwar right?
  • Why is there no successful Radical Rightwing Populist Party in Spain or Portugal?
  • Why was the VB in Flanders so much more successful than the NF in Walloon?
  • Is the AfD a Radical Rightwing Populist Party?
  • Was there ever a chance to stop the rise of the Austrian FPÖ?
  • How does UKIP fit into the Radical Rightwing Populist party family?
  • How does the SVP fit into the Radical Rightwing Populist party family?
  • Is populism a necessary condition for Radical Right-Wing success?
  • Has the FN really changed under Marine Le Pen? If yes, how?
  • OR: Write a report (see above) with one or two fellow students

Aichholzer, Julian, Sylvia Kritzinger, Markus Wagner, and Eva Zeglovits. 2014. “How Has Radical Right Support Transformed Established Political Conflicts? The Case of Austria.” West European Politics 37 (1): 113–37. doi:10.1080/01402382.2013.814956.

Arzheimer, Kai. 2015. “The Afd: Finally a Successful Right-Wing Populist Eurosceptic Party for Germany?” West European Politics 38: 535–56. doi:10.1080/01402382.2015.1004230.

Arzheimer, Kai, and Elisabeth Carter. 2009. “Christian Religiosity and Voting for West European Radical Right Parties.” West European Politics 32 (5): 985–1011. doi:10.1080/01402380903065058.

Blinkhorn, Martin. 2000. Fascism and the Right in Europe, 1919-1945. Harlow: Pearson.

Bos, Linda, and Kees Brants. 2014. “Populist Rhetoric in Politics and Media a Longitudinal Study of the Netherlands.” European Journal of Communication 29 (6): 703–19. doi:10.1177/0267323114545709.

Brug, Wouter van der. 2003. “How the Lpf Fuelled Discontent. Empirical Tests of Explanations of Lpf Support.” Acta Politica 38: 89–106.

Brug, Wouter van der, Meindert Fennema, and Jean Tillie. 2000. “Anti-Immigrant Parties in Europe: Ideological or Protest Vote?” European Journal of Political Research 37 (1): 77–102.

Bulli, Giorgia, and Filippo Tronconi. 2012. “Regionalism, Right-Wing Extremism, Populism. the Elusive Nature of the Lega Nord.” In Mapping the Extreme Right in Contemporary Europe. from Local to Transnational, edited by Andrea Mammone, Emmanuel Godin, and Brian Jenkins, 78–92. London; others: Routledge.

Demker, Marie. 2012. “Scandinavian Right-Wing Parties. Diversity More Than Convergence?” In Mapping the Extreme Right in Contemporary Europe. from Local to Transnational, edited by Andrea Mammone, Emmanuel Godin, and Brian Jenkins, 239–53. London; others: Routledge.

Ellinas, Antonis A. 2012. “LAOS and the Greek Extreme Right Since 1974.” In Mapping the Extreme Right in Contemporary Europe. from Local to Transnational, edited by Andrea Mammone, Emmanuel Godin, and Brian Jenkins, 124–39. London; others: Routledge.

———. 2013. “The Rise of Golden Dawn. the New Face of the Far Right in Greece.” South European Society and Politics 18 (4): 543–65.

Ford, Robert, and Matthew J. Goodwin. 2010. “Angry White Men: Individual and Contextual Predictors of Support for the British National Party.” Political Studies 58 (1): 1–25. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9248.2009.00829.x.

———. 2014. “Understanding Ukip. Identity, Social Change and the Left Behind.” The Political Quarterly 85 (3): 277–84. doi:10.1111/1467-923X.12099.

Hainsworth, Paul. 2000. “The Front National: From Ascendancy to Fragmentation on the French Extreme Right.” In The Politics of the Extreme Right. from the Margins to the Mainstream, edited by Paul Hainsworth, 18–32. London, New York: Pinter.

Holsteyn, Joop J.M. van, and Galen A. Irwin. 2003. “Never a Dull Moment: Pim Fortuyn and the Dutch Parliamentary Election of 2002.” West European Politics 26: 41–66.

Jamin, Jérôme. 2012. “Extreme-Right Discourse in Belgium. a Comparative Regional Approach.” In Mapping the Extreme Right in Contemporary Europe. from Local to Transnational, edited by Andrea Mammone, Emmanuel Godin, and Brian Jenkins, 62–77. London; others: Routledge.

Lange, Sarah L. de. 2007. “A New Winning Formula?: The Programmatic Appeal of the Radical Right.” Party Politics 13 (4): 411–35. doi:10.1177/1354068807075943.

Luther, Kurt Richard. 2000. “Austria: A Democracy Under Threat from the Freedom Party?” Parliamentary Affairs 53: 426–42.

Mayer, Nonna. 2013. “From Jean-Marie to Marine Le Pen: Electoral Change on the Far Right.” Parliamentary Affairs 66 (1): 160–78. doi:10.1093/pa/gss071.

Mudde, Cas. 2007. Populist Radical Right Parties in Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Prowe, Diethelm. 1994. “”Classic” Fascism and the New Radical Right in Western Europe: Comparisons and Contrasts.” Contemporary European History 3: 289–313.

Ruzza, Carlo, and Stefano Fella. 2009. Re-Inventing the Italian Right. Territorial Politics, Populism and “Post-Fascism”. Abingdon, New York: Routledge.

Rydgren, Jens. 2005. “Is Extreme Right-Wing Populism Contagious? Explaining the Emergence of a New Party Family.” European Journal of Political Research 44: 413–37.

———. 2008. “Immigration Sceptics, Xenophobes or Racists? Radical Right-Wing Voting in Six West European Countries.” European Journal of Political Research 47 (6): 737–65. doi:10.1111/j.1475-6765.2008.00784.x.

Skenderovic, Damir. 2012. “Challenging the Exceptionalist View. Favourable Conditions for Radical Right-Wing Populism in Switzerland.” In Mapping the Extreme Right in Contemporary Europe. from Local to Transnational, edited by Andrea Mammone, Emmanuel Godin, and Brian Jenkins, 209–24. London; others: Routledge.

Sommer, Bernd. 2008. “Anti-Capitalism in the Name of Ethno-Nationalism: Ideological Shifts on the German Extreme Right.” Patterns of Prejudice 42 (3): 305–16. doi:10.1080/00313220802204046.

Vasilopoulou, Sofia. 2011. “European Ingegration and the Radical Right. Three Patterns of Opposition.” Government and Opposition 46 (2): 223–44.

Zúquete, José Pedro. 2008. “The European Extreme-Right and Islam. New Directions?” Journal of Political Ideologies 13 (3): 321–44. doi:10.1080/13569310802377019.

The Political System of the United Kingdom

 

Syllabus

 

Outline/Slides

1 22.04.

Introduction: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 3

2 29.04.

The British Tradition: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 4+7, supp: Hay, 2007

3 06.05.

The Constitution: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 10 + Russell, 2011 + Jones and Norton, 2014,
p. 262

4 13.05.

We’ll debate the fallout from the General Election 2015

5 20.05.

Electoral System and Electoral Reform: Dunleavy and Margetts, 2001 + Blau, 2004 + Jones
and Norton, 2014, p. 262

6 27.05.

Parliament: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 19 + Kelso, 2011 + Russell, 2009 (supp.)

7 03.06.

The Core Executive: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 11 + Richards, 2011

8 10.06.

Ministers, Departments, Civil Servants: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 12+13 + Wilson, 2002 +
Rhodes, 2005 (supp.)

9 17.06.

Devolution and the Irish Problem: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 17 + Scully and Wyn Jones, 2011
+ McLean, 2007 (supp.)

10 24.06.

The Party System: Cowley, 2011 + Ford and Goodwin, 2014

11 01.07.

Elections and Voting Behaviour: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 20 + Denver, 2011

12 08.07.

The Media: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 25 + Chadwick and Stanyer, 2011

13 15.07.

Pressure Groups and the Judicary: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 21+24 + Woodhouse, 2002

14 22.07.

Assessing British Democracy: Kavanagh et al., 2006, ch. 32 + Beetham et al., 2003 +
Wilks-Heeg, 2012

Important peer-reviewed journals

  • British Journal of Political Science
  • British Journal of Politics and International Relations
  • Government and Opposition
  • Parliamentary Affairs
  • Political Quarterly
  • Political Studies

Articles from these journals should be available electronically on any computer connected to the university network (either on campus or via VPN).

Assessment

  1. I expect you to come to class well prepared. If you don’t read the assigned texts, participation is pointless.
  2. Even with a medical certificate, you may miss a maximum of two classes.
  3. Assessment is based on satisfactory class performance and your essay. The usual deadline as well as all the usual standards for structure, citations etc. apply.
  4. The American Political Science Association’s style manual
    is a useful but verbose guide (http://www.apsanet.org/files/APSAStyleManual2006.pdf). The
    main points are summarised here: http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/DocAPSA.html.
  5. Please send your essays by mail (leaving enough time for delivery by the due-date), or hand them in to the Studienbüro. I do not accept email submissions
  6. Plagiarism is the most serious academic offence. It is both morally and legally a form of fraud and will not be tolerated. Students who cheat in this way will be awarded a mark of zero.
  7. Essays must be entirely students’ own work, and any passages from the work of others that are quoted directly, or paraphrased or summarised, must be acknowledged and accompanied by full references. Avoid internet sources as they are not normally peer-reviewed. If you absolutely have to use material from the internet, you must give the full
    URL and the date on which the website was accessed.
  8. Essay titles must be chosen from the two lists below.

Essay Topics

  1. At what point did Britain become a Liberal Democracy?
  2. Has Britain’s constitution become more or less democratic during the last 40 years?
  3. What alternative voting systems have been proposed for elections to the Westminster Parliament? Which would be preferable on what grounds?
  4. Would an elected House of Lords weaken or strengthen Parliament?
  5. “The British PM is more powerful than the president of the United States”. Discuss.
  6. Should the House of Commons be reformed? If so, in which ways?
  7. Why have the Liberal Democrats found it so difficult to break the mould of British politics?
  8. What is the most democratic answer to the “English Question”?
  9. Why has the “political role” of the judiciary increased in recent decades?
  10. Has the Human Rights Act strengthened or undermined British democracy?
  11. Does the “Westminster Model” still accurately portray the British political system?

References

Beetham, David et al. (2003). “Democratic Audit: Towards a Broader View of Democratic Achievement”. In:
Parliamentary Affairs 56 (2), pp. 334–347. doi: 10.1093/pa/gsg023.

Blau, Adrian (2004). “Fairness and Electoral Reform”. In: The British Journal of Politics and International
Relations 6.2, pp. 165–181. doi: 10 . 1111 / j . 1467 – _856X . 2004 . 00132 . x. url:
http://www.blackwell-_synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111/j.1467-_856X.2004.00132.x.

Chadwick, Andrew and James Stanyer (2011). “The Changing News Media Environment”. In: Developments in British
Politics 9. Ed. by Richard Heffernan, Philip Cowley and Collin Hay. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 215–237.

Cowley, Philip (2011). “Political Parties and the British Party System”. In: Developments in British Politics 9. Ed. by
Richard Heffernan, Philip Cowley and Collin Hay. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 91–112.

Denver, David (2011). “Elections and Voting”. In: Developments in British Politics 9. Ed. by Richard Heffernan, Philip
Cowley and Collin Hay. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 70–90.

Dunleavy, Patrick and Helen Margetts (2001). “From Majoritarian to Pluralist Democracy?: Electoral Reform in
Britain Since 1997”. In: Journal of Theoretical Politics 13.3, pp. 295–319. doi: 10.1177/095169280101300304.
url: http://jtp.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/095169280101300304.

Ford, Robert and Matthew J. Goodwin (2014). “Understanding UKIP. Identity, Social Change and the Left Behind”.
In: The Political Quarterly 85.3, pp. 277–284. doi: 10.1111/1467-_923X.12099.

Hay, Colin (2007). “Whatever Happened to Thatcherism?” In: Political Studies Review 5.2, pp. 183–201.

Jones, Bill and Philip Norton, eds. (2014). Politics UK. 8th ed. London: Routledge.

Kavanagh, Dennis et al. (2006). British Politics. 5th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kelso, Alexandra (2011). “New Parliamentary Landscapes”. In: Developments in British Politics 9. Ed. by Richard
Heffernan, Philip Cowley and Collin Hay. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 51–69.

McLean, Iain (2007). “The National Question”. In: Blair’s Britain. Ed. by Anthony Seldon. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press, pp. 487–508.

Rhodes, R. A. W. (2005). “Everyday Life in a Ministry: Public Administration as Anthropology”. In: The
American Review of Public Administration 35 (1), pp. 3–25. doi: 10 . 1177 / 0275074004271716. url:
http://arp.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0275074004271716.

Richards, David (2011). “Changing Patterns of Executive Governance”. In: Developments in British Politics 9. Ed. by
Richard Heffernan, Philip Cowley and Collin Hay. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 29–50.

Russell, Meg (2009). “House of Lords Reform: Are We Nearly There Yet?” In: The Political Quarterly 80.1,
pp. 119–125. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-_923X.2009.01968.x.

— (2011). “Constitutional Politics”. In: Developments in British Politics 9. Ed. by Richard Heffernan, Philip Cowley
and Collin Hay. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 7–28.

Scully, Roger and Richard Wyn Jones (2011). “Territorial Politics in Post-Devolution Britain”. In: Developments
in British Politics 9. Ed. by Richard Heffernan, Philip Cowley and Collin Hay. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan,
pp. 113–129.

Wilks-Heeg, Stuart (2012). “How Democratic is the UK? The 2012 Audit”. In: Political Insight 3.2, pp. 8–11. doi:
10.1111/j.2041-_9066.2012.00104.x.

Wilson, Richard (2002). “Portrait of
a Profession Revisited”. In: The Political Quarterly 73.4, pp. 381–391. doi: 10.1111/1467-_923X.00492. url:
http://www.blackwell-_synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111/1467-_923X.00492.

Woodhouse, Diana (2002). “The Law and Politics: In the Shadow of the Human Rights Act”. In:
Parliamentary Affairs 55 (2), pp. 254–270. doi: 10 . 1093 / parlij / 55 . 2 . 254. url:
http://pa.oupjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/parlij/55.2.254.

Political Integration after Lisbon

 

Assessment

  • Assesment is based on your essay (5000-6000 words). Moreover, you must pass the class test. Your essay title must be chosen from the list that I will distribute
  • The Department’s universal deadline applies. There is only one deadline, and no extensions will be granted. Should you fall ill, you must provide a medical certificate.
  • Please send your essays by mail (leaving enough time for delivery by the due-date), or hand it in to the

Essay titles

    1. What role has German-French cooperation played in the European integration process? Where do their particular interests overlap and where do they differ?
    2. What evidence is there for (a) supranationalism and (b) intergovernmentalism in the complex of institutions that comprises the Council of Ministers?
    3. How can the increase of power of the European Parliament be explained during the 1980s and 1990s?
    4. How has the balance of powers between the institutions changed since the founding treaties?
    5. What political and institutional impact did German unification have on the European Community in 1990?
    6. What are the political and institutional implications of the Single Market?
    7. Discuss the different reasons why four EU member states did not join the third stage of EMU in 1999. Will Denmark, Sweden and the UK join in the future?
    8. What has the reforms of Common Agricultural Policy made so difficult? Describe these reforms and explain the challenges for the CAP after the 2004/2007 enlargement.
    9. Why are foreign and security matters on EU level still predominantly intergovernmental?
    10. “The Treaty of Lisbon saved most of the failed Constitution’s substance” – discuss
    11. “Like Amsterdam and Nice, the Treaty of Lisbon is not a constitutional leap but rather just another minor amendment of the Maastricht Treaty”

Readings

You should buy one of these textbooks:

      • Cini, M. (ed.), European Union Politics (Oxford: OUP 2009)
      • Hix, S., The Political System of the European Union (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2005, 2nd ed.)
      • Nugent, N., The Government and Politics of the European Union, (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2006, 6th edition)
      • Wallace, H., Pollack, M. and Young, A. (eds), Policy-making in the European Union, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, 6th ed.)

Reading List

      • We will put some of the texts on the ReaderPlus system. The Reader Number is 8334. You will get an access code (required for self-registration) at the start of term.
      • Course Outline

General Information

Slides

Theory and Measurement of Democratic Attitudes

 

Course Contents/Slides (Seminar)

April 21 Attitudes, values, ideology (print) Feldman (2003); Bartels (2003)
April 28 Measuring attitudes (print) Fabrigar, Krosnick and MacDougall (2005); supp.: Krosnick and Presser (2010)
May 5 Political Culture (print) Almond and Verba (1965, ch. 1+2)
May 12 Political Support, old and new (print) Dalton (1999); Inglehart (1999)
May 19 A classic qualitative approach to democratic ideology (print) Lane (1962, 1–16; 82-112)
May 26 The original democracy scale and its re-application (print) McClosky (1964, 365–371); Chong, McClosky and Zaller (1983)
June 9 Democracy and Communism in Germany (print) Dalton (1994)
June 16 From Russia with love (print) Gibson, Duch and Tedin (1992); supp.: Miller, Hesli and Reisinger (1997)
June 30 Losing my religion (print) Tessler (2002); Canetti-Nisim (2004)
July 7 What flavour of democrats/democracy? I (print) Walker (2009)
July 14 What flavour of democrats/democracy? II (print) Schedler and Sarsfield (2007)
July 21 Summary: Where do we go from here, and what does it matter? (print) Fails and Pierce (2010)

Assessment

  • Assesment is based on your essay (5000-6000 words). Your essay title must be chosen from the list that I will distribute
  • The Department’s universal deadline applies. There is only one deadline, and no extensions will be granted. Should you fall ill, you must provide a medical certificate.
  • Please send your essays by mail (leaving enough time for delivery by the due-date), or hand it in to the

Essay titles

  1. Do attitudes and political cultures matter?
  2. Does social science need a separate ‘support for democracy’ scale for Central and Eastern Europe?
  3. ‘Religion and Democracy are incompatible.’ Discuss!
  4. How and why should the original McClosky scale be amended?
  5. What, if anything, could/should Western scholars learn from the indicators and findings from the African, Latin, and Arab Barometer surveys?
  6. Do standard scales adequately reflect the different concepts of democracy?
  7. Has our notion of democracy changed so much since the 1960s that we need a new scale? What would it look like?

Members of the A-Team may write an essay based on their own data.

Readings

 

   Almond, Gabriel A. and Sidney Verba. 1965. The Civic Culture. Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.

Bartels, Larry M.. 2003. Democracy with Attitudes. In Electoral Democracy, ed. Michael B. MacKuen and George Rabinowitz. University of Michigan Press pp. 48–82.

Canetti-Nisim, Daphna. 2004. “The Effect of Religiosity on Endorsement of Democratic Values. The Mediating Influence of Authoritarianism.” Political Behavior 26(4):377–398.

Chong, Dennis, Herbert McClosky and John Zaller. 1983. “Patterns of Support for Democratic and Capitalist Values in the United States.” British Journal of Political Science 13(4):401–440.

Dalton, Russell J. 1994. “Communists and Democrats. Democratic Attitudes in the Two Germanies.” British Journal of Political Science 24(4):469–493.
URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/194030

Dalton, Russell J. 1999. Political Support in Advanced Industrial Democracies. In Critical Citizens. Global Support for Democratic Government, ed. Pippa Norris. Oxford u.a.: Oxford University Press pp. 57–77.

Fabrigar, Leandre R., Jon Krosnick and Bonnie L. MacDougall. 2005. Attitudes Measurement. Techniques for Measuring the Unobservable. In Persuasion: Psychological Insights and Perspectives, ed. Timothy C. Brock and Melanie C. Green. 2 ed. Tousand Oaks, London, New Delhi: Sage pp. 17–40.

Fails, Matthew D. and Heather Nicole Pierce. 2010. “Changing Mass Attitudes and Democratic Deepening.” Political Research Quarterly 63(1):174–187.

Feldman, Stanley. 2003. Values, Ideology, and the Structure of Political Attitudes. In Oxford Handbook of Political Psychology, ed. David Sears, Leonie Huddy and Robert Jervis. 3 ed. Oxford University Press.

Gibson, James L., Raymond M. Duch and Kent L. Tedin. 1992. “Democratic Values and the Transformation of the Soviet Union.” The Journal of Politics 54(2):329–371.

Inglehart, Ronald. 1999. Postmodernization Erodes Respect for Authority, but Increases Support for Democracy. In Critical Citizens. Global Support for Democratic Government, ed. Pippa Norris. Oxford u.a.: Oxford University Press pp. 236–256.

Krosnick, Jon A. and Stanley Presser. 2010. Question and Questionnaire Design. In Handbook of Survey Research, ed. Peter V. Marsden and James D. Wright. 2 ed. Bingley: Emerald pp. 263–313.

Lane, Robert E. 1962. Political Ideology. Why the American Common Man Believes What He Does. New York: The Free Press of Glencoe.

McClosky, Herbert. 1964. “Consensus and Ideology in American Politics.” The American Political Science Review 58(2):361–382.

Miller, Arthur H., Vicki L. Hesli and William M. Reisinger. 1997. “Conceptions of Democracy among Mass and Elite in Post-Soviet Societies.” British Journal of Political Science 27(2):157–190.

Schedler, Andreas and Rodolfo Sarsfield. 2007. “Democrats with Adjectives: Linking Direct and Indirect Measures of Democratic Support.” European Journal of Political Research 46(5):637–659.

Tessler, Mark. 2002. “Do Islamic Orientations Influence Attitudes Toward Democracy in the Arab World? Evidence from Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, and Algeria.” International Journal of Comparative Sociology 43(3-5):229–249.

Walker, Lee Demetrius. 2009. “Delegative Democratic Attitudes and Institutional Support in Central America.” Comparative Politics 42(1):83–101.

Unified Germany in Perspective

 

Course Contents/Slides

Unification has changed the once hyper-stable German polity more profoundly than many professional observers would have expected. More than 20 years after the fact, this seminar looks at various core features of the German system (e.g. the party system, civil society, federalism, Rhenanian capitalism) to assess the lasting impact of the FRG/GDR merger.

April 24 An unexpected, unresolved unification Schmidt (2004, ch. 6); Kitschelt and Streek (2003)
May 8 The other half of Germany Fulbrook (1995, 21-56, 129-150); supp.: Childs (1983); Dennis (1988)
May 15 Still “Capitalism with a Human Face”? Edinger (1998, ch. 5),Leibfried and Obinger (2003)
May 22 Whatever happened to federalism? Gunlicks (2002); Auel (2008); supp: Benz (2008)
June 5 Foreign policy: A new role for the 21st century? Green et al. (2008, ch. 9+10); supp.: Overhaus (2004)
June 12 Who is German? Minkenberg (2003); Kruse, Orren and Angenendt (2003),Howard (2008)
June 26 Right-Wing extremism in unified Germany Backer (2000); Lubbers and Scheepers (2001)
July 3 The wall in People’s Heads Dalton and Weldon (2010); supp.: Bauer-Kaase and Kaase (1996)
July 10 The party formerly known as “Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands” Koß and Hough (2006); supp.: Hough, Koß and Olsen (2007)
July 17 Parties, party systems, coalitions Kropp (2010); Detterbeck (2008)
July 24 Review: “Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose” Padget (2005); Pulzer (2006)

Assessment

  • Assesment is based on your essay (5000-6000 words). Your essay title must be chosen from the list that I will distribute
  • The Department’s universal deadline applies. There is only one deadline, and no extensions will be granted. Should you fall ill, you must provide a medical certificate.
  • Please do not send your essay by mail. Hand it in to the office in the usual way.

Essay titles

  1. Why was dictatorship so stable in the GDR?
  2. Was the reform of federalism in the New Germany a success? How likely are further changes?
  3. Why is the PDS/Left still a major political force in Germany?
  4. Is there an Extreme Right movement in Germany? Why are the parties of the Extrem Right so weak (as compared to Austria Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, The Netherlands)?
  5. How do East and West Germans differ in their attitudes towards politics and the political community? Are these differences likely to disappear in the future?
  6. Is there an East-West-Cleavage (in the sense of the Lipset-Rokkan model)?
  7. How has the German party system changed since unification, and how can these changes be explained?
  8. Does Germany still have a ‘Social Market Economy’?
  9. Is there any evidence for a militarisation of German foreign policy?
  10. Does unified Germany feature a stable democratic political culture?

Online Textbook

Russell Dalton has made his excellent Textbook (Politics in Germany, 2nd edition) available online! And yes, if you cannot be bothered to read, there is even some video content.

Readings

 

Auel, Katrin. 2008. “Still No Exit from the Joint Decision Trap: The German Federal Reform(s).” German Politics 17(4):424–439.

Backer, Susann. 2000. Right-wing Extremism in Unified Germany. In The Politics of the Extreme Right. From the Margins to the Mainstream, ed. Paul Hainsworth. London, New York: Pinter pp. 87–120.

Bauer-Kaase, Petra and Max Kaase. 1996. “Five Years of Unification. The Germans on the Path to Inner Unity.” German Politics 5(1):1–25.

Benz, Arthur. 2008. “From Joint Decision Traps to Over-regulated Federalism: Adverse Effects of a Successful Constitutional Reform.” German Politics 17(4).

Campbell, William Ross. 2004. “The Sources of Institutional Trust in East and West Germany: Civic Culture or Economic Performance?” German Politics 13(3):401–418.

Childs, David. 1983. The GDR, Moscow’s German Ally. London,Boston: G. Allen & Unwin.

Dalton, Russell J. and Steven Weldon. 2010. “Germans Divided? Political Culture in a United Germany German Politics.” German Politics 19(1):9–23. perfekt für GP-Kurs.

Dennis, Mike. 1988. German Democratic Republic : Politics, Economics and Society. London: Pinter.

Detterbeck, Klaus. 2008. “Party Cartel and Cartel Parties in Germany.” German Politics 17(1):27–40.

Edinger, Lewis J. Nacos, Brigitte L. 1998. From Bonn to Berlin: German Politics in Transition. New York: Columbia University Press.

Fulbrook, Mary. 1995. Anatomy of a Dictatorship. Inside the GDR. Oxford u.a.: Oxford University Press.

Green, Simon O., Dan Hough, Alister Miskimmon and Graham Timmins. 2008. The Politics of the New Germany. London: Routledge.

Gunlicks, Arthur. 2002. “The Impact of Unification on German Federalism.” German Politics 11(3):131–152.

Hough, Dan, Michael Koß and Jonathan Olsen. 2007. The Left Party in Contemporary German Politics. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.

Howard, Marc Mojé. 2008. “The Causes and Consequences of Germany’s New Citizenship Law.” German Politics 17(1):41–62.

Kitschelt, Herbert and Wolfgang Streek. 2003. “From Stability to Stagnation. Germany at the Beginning of the Twenty-First Century.” West European Politics 26(4):1–34.

Koß, Michael and Daniel Hough. 2006. “Between a Rock and Many Hard Places: The PDS and Government Participation in the Eastern German Länder.” German Politics 15:73–98.

Kropp, Sabine. 2010. “The Ubiquity and Strategic Complexity of Grand Coalition in the German Federal System.” German Politics 19(3/4):286–311.

Kruse, Imke, Henry Edward Orren and Steffen Angenendt. 2003. “The Failure of Immigration Reform in Germany.” German Politics 12(3):129–145.

Leibfried, Stephan and Herbert Obinger. 2003. “The State of the Welfare State. German Social Policy between Macroeconomic Retrenchment and Microeconomic Recalibration.” West European Politics 26(4):199–218.

Lubbers, Marcel and Peer Scheepers. 2001. “Explaining the Trend in Extreme Right-Wing Voting. Germany 1989-1998.” European Sociological Review 17:431–449.

Minkenberg, Michael. 2003. “The Politics of Citizenship in the New Republic.” West European Politics 26(4):219–240.

Overhaus, Marco. 2004. “In Search of a Post-Hegemonic Order: Germany, NATO and the European Security and Defence Policy.” German Politics 13(4):551–568.

Padget, Stephen. 2005. “The Party Politics of Economic Reform: Public Opinion, Party Positions and Partisan Cleavages.” German Politics 14:248–274.

Pulzer, Peter. 2006. “Germany Votes for Deadlock: The Federal Election of 2005.” West European Politics 29:560–572.

Roberts, Geoffrey K. 2009. German Politics Today. 2 ed. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Schmidt, Manfred G. 2004. Political Institutions in the Federal Republic of Germany. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Europeanisation of Germany or Germanification of Europe?

 

Aims and Objectives

By the end of term, students should (at the very least) …

  • Acquire a basic knowledge of European Union policy making
  • Be familiar with (various) notions of ‘europeanisation’ and ‘multi-level governance’
  • Understand the impact of the European Union on politics in Germany
  • Be able to gauge the influence of Germany in Europe.

Your Duties

  • All students: Regular attendance, participation in class
  • For those requiring fully credits (‘Modulleistung’, ‘Schein’): You must submit an essay
    • Your essay must focus on its title/research question
    • You must pick a title from a list below
    • All the usual guidelines/requirements apply (see the departmental website)
    • There is only one (the general) deadline
  • You must be willing and able to read a lot from week to week. The required readings are on the ReaderPlus system.
  • Plagiarism is the most deadly academic sin. If I find you cheating, you will receive a fail mark, and I will consider further action

Essay Questions

 

  1. Critically define the concept of Europeanisation. How is it different from older concepts such as European Integration or Multilevel Governance? Is it a useful concept at all?
  2. “Europeanisation undermines democracy in Germany”. Discuss.
  3. “Without europeanised media, there can be no real democracy in the EU”. Do you agree?
  4. Could German federalism become a model for a more democratic European Union?
  5. Has Europeanisation already transformed the German welfare state? Do you expect
    major changes over the next five to ten years?
  6. Is there a case for a further Europeanisation of Higher Education Policy in
    Europe? Should the EU be responsible for primary and secondary education?
  7. “European asylum and migration policies are a failure”. Discuss.
  8. Will the Federal Constitutional Court put an end to further Europeanisation of the
    German polity?
  9. “Current developments in EMU serve German (and Dutch) interests at the expense of
    other Eurozone members”. Do you agree? Why (or why not)?
  10. Does Germany meet its responsibilities with respect to the CFSP?

Slides/Course Outline

I will put the slides on my website after class

1Introduction (PDF)print (PDF)
2The EU and Public Policy (PDF)print (PDF)
3Democratic Deficit and Deparlamentarisation (PDF)print (PDF)
4Parliament (PDF)print (PDF)
5Federalism (PDF)print (PDF)
6Justice (PDF)print (PDF)
7Parties (PDF)print (PDF)
8The Media (PDF)print (PDF)
9(Higher) Education (PDF)print (PDF)
10Social Policy (PDF)print (PDF)
11A European Vocation/CFSP (PDF)print (PDF)
12JHA, Migration, Asylum (PDF)print (PDF)
13Economic and Monetary Union (PDF)print (PDF)
14Summary: Germany and the EU

Required Readings (PDF)

Course Outline

21.04.

Introduction

Europeanisation: Börzel and Risse, 2003; Radaelli,

2003; Germany: Anderson, 2005 ; background: Mc-

Cormick, 2014; Bulmer and Lequesne, 2005, ch. 1-3

28.04. The EU and Public Policy

Wallace, Pollack and Young, 2015, ch. 1-3

Europeanisation: Polity

12.05. Democratic Deficit and Deparlamentarisation?

Follesdal and Hix, 2006, Auel, 2006

19.05.

Parliament

Kropp, 2010

02.06.

Federalism

Moore and Eppler, 2008

09.06.

Justice

Panke, 2007, Doukas, 2009

Europeanisation: Politics

16.06.

Parties

Carter and Poguntke, 2010; Wimmel and Edwards,

2011

Europeanisation: Policy

23.06.

(Higher) Education

Toens, 2009

30.06.

An Emerging European/Europeanised Domain: So-

Wallace, Pollack and Young, 2015, ch. 11

cial Policy

New Intergovernmentalism?

07.07.

A European Vocation? /CFSP

Kirchner, 2010; Miskimmon, 2014 and Paterson,

2011; background: Paterson, 2014,

14.07.

JHA, Migration, Asylum

Menz, 2011

21.07.

Economic and Monetary Union

Busch, 2014; Featherstone, 2011; Van Esch, 2012;

background: Wallace, Pollack and Young, 2015, ch.

7

Important Journals (Selection)

European Journal of Public Policy

Journal of Common Market Studies

German Politics

West European Politics

References

Background

Bulmer, Simon and Christian Lequesne, eds. (2005). The Member States of the European Union. Oxford Uni- versity Press.

Featherstone, Kevin and Claudio M. Radaelli, eds. (2003). The Politics of Europeanization. Oxford: Oxford University Press. doi: 10.1093/0199252092.001.0001. url: http://www.oxfordscholarship. com/view/10.1093/0199252092.001.0001/acprof-9780199252091.

Hix, Simon (2005). The Political System of the European Union. 3rd ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

McCormick, John (2014). Understanding the European Union. A Concise Introduction. 6th ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Nugent, Neill (2010). The Government and Politics of the European Union. 7th ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Required reading

Anderson, Jeffrey J. (2005). “Germany and Europe: Centrality in the EU”. In: The Member States of the European Union. Ed. by Simon Bulmer and Christian Lequesne. Oxford University Press, pp. 77–96.

Auel, Katrin (2006). “The Europeanisation of the German Bundestag: Institutional Change and Informal Ad- aptation”. In: German Politics 15.3, pp. 249–268.

Bulmer, Simon and Christian Lequesne, eds. (2005). The Member States of the European Union. Oxford Uni- versity Press.

Busch, Andreas (2014). “Germany and the Euro”. In: Developments in German Politics 4. Ed. by Stephen Padgett, William E. Paterson and Reimut Zohlnhöfer. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 188–210.

Börzel, Tanja and Thomas Risse (2003). “Conceptualizing the Domestic Impact of Europe”. In: The Politics of Europeanization. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 57–80. doi: 10.1093/0199252092.003. 0003.

Carter, Elisabeth and Thomas Poguntke (2010). “How European Integration Changes National Parties: Evidence from a 15-Country Study”. In: West European Politics 33.2, pp. 297–324. doi: 10.1080/01402380903538930

Doukas, Dimitros (2009). “The Verdict of the German Federal Constitutional Court on the Lisbon Treaty: Not Guilty, but Don’t Do It Again!” In: European Law Review 34, pp. 866–888.

Featherstone, Kevin (2011). “The JCMS Annual Lecture: The Greek Sovereign Debt Crisis and EMU: A Failing State in a Skewed Regime”. In: Journal of Common Market Studies 49.2, pp. 193–217. doi: 10.1111/ j.1468-5965.2010.02139.x.

Follesdal, Andreas and Simon Hix (2006). “Why There is a Democratic Deficit in the EU: A Response to Majone and Moravcsik”. In: Journal of Common Market Studies 44.3, pp. 533–562. doi: 10.1111/j. 1468-5965.2006.00650.x.

Kirchner, Emil J. (2010). “Germany’s Role in European and International Security: Aims versus Action”. In:

Rethinking Germany and Europe. Democracy and Diplomacy in a Semi-Sovereign State. Ed. by Simon Bulmer and Stephen Jeffrey Charlie an Padgett. London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 139–151.

Kropp, Sabine (2010). “German Parliamentary Party Groups in Europeanised Policymaking: Awakening from the Sleep? Institutions and Heuristics as MPs’ Resources”. In: German Politics 19.2, pp. 123–147. doi:10.1080/09644001003774198.

McCormick, John (2014). Understanding the European Union. A Concise Introduction. 6th ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Menz, Georg (2011). “Stopping, Shaping and Moulding Europe: Two-Level Games, Non-state Actors and the Europeanization of Migration Policies”. In: Journal of Common Market Studies 49.2, pp. 437–462. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-5965.2010.02123.x.

Miskimmon, Alister (2014). “Foreign and Security Policy”. In: Developments in German Politics 4. Ed. by Stephen Padgett, William E. Paterson and Reimut Zohlnhöfer. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 211– 226.

Moore, Carolyn and Annegret Eppler (2008). “Disentangling Double Politikverflechtung? The Implications of the Federal Reforms for Bund-Länder Relations on Europe”. In: German Politics 17.4, pp. 488–508. doi: 10.1080/09644000802490527.

Panke, Diana (2007). “The European court of justice as an agent of europeanization? Restoring compliance with EU law”. In: Journal of European Public Policy 14.6, pp. 847–866. doi: 10.1080/13501760701497709.

Paterson, William E. (2011). “The Reluctant Hegemon? Germany Moves Centre Stage in the European Union”. In: Journal of Common Market Studies 49, pp. 57–75. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-5965.2011.02184. x. url: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-5965.2011.02184.x.

(2014). “Germany and the European Union”. In: Developments in German Politics 4. Ed. by Stephen Padgett, William E. Paterson and Reimut Zohlnhöfer. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 166–187.

Radaelli, Claudio M. (2003). “The Europeanization of Public Policy”. In: The Politics of Europeanization. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 27–56. doi: 10.1093/0199252092.003.0002.

Toens, Katrin (2009). “The Bologna Process in German Educational Federalism: State Strategies, Policy Frag- mentation and Interest Mediation”. In: German Politics 18.2, pp. 246–264. doi: 10.1080/09644000902870875.

Van Esch, Femke (2012). “Why Germany Wanted EMU: The Role of Helmut Kohl’s Belief System and the Fall of the Berlin Wall”. In: German Politics 21.1, pp. 34–52. doi: 10.1080/09644008.2012.655012.

Wallace, Helen, Mark A. Pollack and Alasdair R. Young, eds. (2015). Policy-Making in the European Union. 7th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Wimmel, Andreas and Erica E. Edwards (2011). “The Return of ‘Social Europe’: Ideas and Positions of German Parties towards the Future of European Integration”. In: German Politics 20.2, pp. 293–314. doi: 10. 1080/09644001003774206.